Workout of the Month - TRX Progression 2 with Coach Reem Jishi

​Join OutRival Racing Coach Reem Jishi as she takes you through the second progression in this full body TRX series.
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Need Hip Mobility?? Hurdle!

As a high school and collegiate hurdler many moons ago, I trained to sprint, maneuver, stretch, eat, sleep and breathe everything with “hurdles”. I was my fastest and most flexible during this time of my life. Of course, youth and the specificity of being a sprinter and power-based athlete made me fast, but also, the hurdle drills and mobility routines I performed developed me into a more efficient runner, which meant “faster”. This hip mobility work molded coordinated movement patterns, improved my rotational balance and agility, and strengthened my core and lower body all while requiring my hips to develop fluidity, flexibility and a great range of motion.
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Hiking – The Ten Essentials

If you’ve read the intrepid Jesse Kropelnicki’s thoughts on integrating hiking into your Ironman training, you know how beneficial it is. Hiking is a terrific opportunity to build durability and practice fueling, all while visiting some beautiful scenery. And, even though many states currently have COVID travel restrictions, that doesn’t mean you can’t explore your area!
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Workout of the Month - Tri & Run Strength with Coach Mary Kelley - Weights & Bands #7

Coach Mary Kelley of OutRival Racing introduces 6 strength, stability core exercises that can be done anywhere, during any phase of training. Stabilize your core, strengthen your posterior chain, and work every major muscle group with this efficient session designed for triathletes and runners.
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How to Find the Right Coach For You

You’re chasing a big, new goal and ready to hire a triathlon coach to help guide your training. But how do you find a coach who fits your needs? There are several questions to consider: What type of personality motivates you? What type of feedback would you like for your training sessions? USA Triathlon Level I Certified Coach Taylor Mahan-Rudolph gives her tips to find the right coach for you.
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Athlete Spotlight - Bekki Schwartz

Meet OutRival Racing Athlete Bekki Schwartz coached by Mary Kelley
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Why Triathletes Should Dabble In Gravel

As a triathlete you have likely heard some things about gravel cycling but maybe haven’t tried it yet. As a triathlon coach for over ten years, I’m here to tell you – there are many reasons to check it out and here are the top 5.
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Racing As a Pro - We Have Our Doubts Too

As a woman getting my PhD, I had plenty of doubts – most of all wondering if I really did belong there. Finding triathlon, however, was different. First, when I started in 2014, I had no idea what I was doing and that was a bit of a blessing in disguise, when you don’t know what you don’t know, it's hard to question it. Second, it was just for fun, a new hobby, and outlet for energy. Third, it turned out I was fairly good at it, the swim was hard, but I could make up for that on the bike and the run, of which especially the last came a lot more natural to me. As I progressed to the 70.3 distance, and the realization came that I could compete at the top end of the age group field grew, the pressure did go up a bit. I was however still so new at all of this that the elements of joy and surprise outshone any doubts I had about myself.
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Pre-Run Strength Routine

As a personal trainer and running coach, when I prepare run training programs, strength training is always an integral part. Strength training has many benefits including contributing to increased lean muscle mass, strength of connective tissue, bone density, resting metabolism and cardiovascular health. Strength training can also improve balance, coordination and posture, boost energy levels and improve mood. As runners, strength training, particularly exercises focused on lateral hip stability and rotational core strength, helps us attain and maintain proper running form, which in turn allows us to run longer and faster, and reduces the likelihood of injury.
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Finding Your Summit

At times, the climb is steep, and it hurts. I work to gain elevation only to then lose it as I round the bend. These consistent setbacks mirror those I have endured throughout my 30+ years of being involved in triathlon, which begs the question--why bother? Why bother doing all that work, mentally willing myself through moments of fatigue and suffering only to lose all momentum moments later?
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​Join OutRival Racing Coach Reem Jishi as she takes you through the second progression in this full body TRX series.
As a high school and collegiate hurdler many moons ago, I trained to sprint, maneuver, stretch, eat, sleep and breathe everything with “hurdles”. I was my fastest and most flexible during this time of my life. Of course, youth and the specificity of being a sprinter and power-based athlete made me fast, but also, the hurdle drills and mobility routines I performed developed me into a more efficient runner, which meant “faster”. This hip mobility work molded coordinated movement patterns, improved my rotational balance and agility, and strengthened my core and lower body all while requiring my hips to develop fluidity, flexibility and a great range of motion.
If you’ve read the intrepid Jesse Kropelnicki’s thoughts on integrating hiking into your Ironman training, you know how beneficial it is. Hiking is a terrific opportunity to build durability and practice fueling, all while visiting some beautiful scenery. And, even though many states currently have COVID travel restrictions, that doesn’t mean you can’t explore your area!
Coach Mary Kelley of OutRival Racing introduces 6 strength, stability core exercises that can be done anywhere, during any phase of training. Stabilize your core, strengthen your posterior chain, and work every major muscle group with this efficient session designed for triathletes and runners.
You’re chasing a big, new goal and ready to hire a triathlon coach to help guide your training. But how do you find a coach who fits your needs? There are several questions to consider: What type of personality motivates you? What type of feedback would you like for your training sessions? USA Triathlon Level I Certified Coach Taylor Mahan-Rudolph gives her tips to find the right coach for you.
Meet OutRival Racing Athlete Bekki Schwartz coached by Mary Kelley
As a triathlete you have likely heard some things about gravel cycling but maybe haven’t tried it yet. As a triathlon coach for over ten years, I’m here to tell you – there are many reasons to check it out and here are the top 5.
As a woman getting my PhD, I had plenty of doubts – most of all wondering if I really did belong there. Finding triathlon, however, was different. First, when I started in 2014, I had no idea what I was doing and that was a bit of a blessing in disguise, when you don’t know what you don’t know, it's hard to question it. Second, it was just for fun, a new hobby, and outlet for energy. Third, it turned out I was fairly good at it, the swim was hard, but I could make up for that on the bike and the run, of which especially the last came a lot more natural to me. As I progressed to the 70.3 distance, and the realization came that I could compete at the top end of the age group field grew, the pressure did go up a bit. I was however still so new at all of this that the elements of joy and surprise outshone any doubts I had about myself.
As a personal trainer and running coach, when I prepare run training programs, strength training is always an integral part. Strength training has many benefits including contributing to increased lean muscle mass, strength of connective tissue, bone density, resting metabolism and cardiovascular health. Strength training can also improve balance, coordination and posture, boost energy levels and improve mood. As runners, strength training, particularly exercises focused on lateral hip stability and rotational core strength, helps us attain and maintain proper running form, which in turn allows us to run longer and faster, and reduces the likelihood of injury.
At times, the climb is steep, and it hurts. I work to gain elevation only to then lose it as I round the bend. These consistent setbacks mirror those I have endured throughout my 30+ years of being involved in triathlon, which begs the question--why bother? Why bother doing all that work, mentally willing myself through moments of fatigue and suffering only to lose all momentum moments later?