Racing As a Pro - We Have Our Doubts Too

As a woman getting my PhD, I had plenty of doubts – most of all wondering if I really did belong there. Finding triathlon, however, was different. First, when I started in 2014, I had no idea what I was doing and that was a bit of a blessing in disguise, when you don’t know what you don’t know, it's hard to question it. Second, it was just for fun, a new hobby, and outlet for energy. Third, it turned out I was fairly good at it, the swim was hard, but I could make up for that on the bike and the run, of which especially the last came a lot more natural to me. As I progressed to the 70.3 distance, and the realization came that I could compete at the top end of the age group field grew, the pressure did go up a bit. I was however still so new at all of this that the elements of joy and surprise outshone any doubts I had about myself.
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Choose Your Own Adventure

We can still achieve a lot of our primary motivations for endurance sport, even without racing! But how do we do this? By choosing our own adventure! Coach Doug explains further in our blog post!
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Game Time - Mental Fitness Tips and Tricks

Sharpening our mental training skills can have a tremendous advantage with staying in control under pressure, being more consistent in our training, performing at our best ability, and exceeding our best at our most important competitions. Coach Amy Javens talks about these skills in this blog!
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Tri-ing in the New Normal

As triathletes, we embrace structure, predictability, control, routine.  We lay out our goals far in advance and then plan a season to prepare to achieve those goals. We develop a base, we build, we do race specific work, we taper, we race, and we do it again.  We swim on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.  We do our bike intervals on Tuesdays and our long ride on Saturdays.  We hit the track on Thursdays and do our long run on Sundays.  We mix in strength training and body work.  We focus on our nutrition before, during and after our training sessions.  We analyze our Garmin files.  We replace our running shoes as soon as they show wear.   We look for the latest gadgets, the fastest wetsuit.  All of our efforts are laser directed at achieving our goal of hitting that PR on our A race day.  
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As a woman getting my PhD, I had plenty of doubts – most of all wondering if I really did belong there. Finding triathlon, however, was different. First, when I started in 2014, I had no idea what I was doing and that was a bit of a blessing in disguise, when you don’t know what you don’t know, it's hard to question it. Second, it was just for fun, a new hobby, and outlet for energy. Third, it turned out I was fairly good at it, the swim was hard, but I could make up for that on the bike and the run, of which especially the last came a lot more natural to me. As I progressed to the 70.3 distance, and the realization came that I could compete at the top end of the age group field grew, the pressure did go up a bit. I was however still so new at all of this that the elements of joy and surprise outshone any doubts I had about myself.
We can still achieve a lot of our primary motivations for endurance sport, even without racing! But how do we do this? By choosing our own adventure! Coach Doug explains further in our blog post!
Sharpening our mental training skills can have a tremendous advantage with staying in control under pressure, being more consistent in our training, performing at our best ability, and exceeding our best at our most important competitions. Coach Amy Javens talks about these skills in this blog!
As triathletes, we embrace structure, predictability, control, routine.  We lay out our goals far in advance and then plan a season to prepare to achieve those goals. We develop a base, we build, we do race specific work, we taper, we race, and we do it again.  We swim on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.  We do our bike intervals on Tuesdays and our long ride on Saturdays.  We hit the track on Thursdays and do our long run on Sundays.  We mix in strength training and body work.  We focus on our nutrition before, during and after our training sessions.  We analyze our Garmin files.  We replace our running shoes as soon as they show wear.   We look for the latest gadgets, the fastest wetsuit.  All of our efforts are laser directed at achieving our goal of hitting that PR on our A race day.