Mastering the IM Run

Like an effective taper protocol, the Ironman marathon remains one of the greatest mysteries of our sport. “A mystery, wrapped in an enigma”, those who have it figured out make it look so easy, and we wonder how and why it is possible to run with such ease, after a 112-mile ride. They are few and far between, but we see them at every race, running their way through fields of competitors who can only watch as they pass by.
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Athlete Spotlight - Stewart Frey

Meet OutRival Racing athlete Stewart Frey coached by Dawn English.
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Anything That Kills Consistency Isn't Worth Doing

Throw-back blog (circa 2009) from QT2 Founder Jesse Kropelnicki on why training too hard kills consistency and leads to injury and impedes long-term performance.
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Athlete Spotlight - Ken Campbell

Meet OutRival Racing Team Member Ken Campbell coached by Jackie Miller.
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My First Ironman

Signing up for your very first full Ironman is an exciting and scary time! If you are considering crossing the threshold over to the 140.6 distance, here are some things to consider. While Ironman can provide personal fulfillment and a sense of a great achievement, be aware of the time and financial costs involved before hitting the confirmation button on the registration page. Training will start off manageable, with anywhere between 5 to 10 hours a week. At the height of training, an athlete may get into the 15-20 hours per week range. (For some maybe more!) Does your career and family life allow for this type of time commitment? If not, maybe now is not the right time. If yes, then it is a good idea to sit down with your family, significant other and boss to explain WHY you want to do this, WHY it is important to you, and the time and money involved in this endeavor. If they know what to expect and the reasons as to why it is important to you, it will make it easier on everyone and you will find yourself with a good support system.
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Hiking – The Ten Essentials

If you’ve read the intrepid Jesse Kropelnicki’s thoughts on integrating hiking into your Ironman training, you know how beneficial it is. Hiking is a terrific opportunity to build durability and practice fueling, all while visiting some beautiful scenery. And, even though many states currently have COVID travel restrictions, that doesn’t mean you can’t explore your area!
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How to Find the Right Coach For You

You’re chasing a big, new goal and ready to hire a triathlon coach to help guide your training. But how do you find a coach who fits your needs? There are several questions to consider: What type of personality motivates you? What type of feedback would you like for your training sessions? USA Triathlon Level I Certified Coach Taylor Mahan-Rudolph gives her tips to find the right coach for you.
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Racing As a Pro - We Have Our Doubts Too

As a woman getting my PhD, I had plenty of doubts – most of all wondering if I really did belong there. Finding triathlon, however, was different. First, when I started in 2014, I had no idea what I was doing and that was a bit of a blessing in disguise, when you don’t know what you don’t know, it's hard to question it. Second, it was just for fun, a new hobby, and outlet for energy. Third, it turned out I was fairly good at it, the swim was hard, but I could make up for that on the bike and the run, of which especially the last came a lot more natural to me. As I progressed to the 70.3 distance, and the realization came that I could compete at the top end of the age group field grew, the pressure did go up a bit. I was however still so new at all of this that the elements of joy and surprise outshone any doubts I had about myself.
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IRONMAN Race Day Tips

If you are about to race to race your first Ironman or maybe just need some reminders on race day tips, Jackie Miller has you covered!
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Return To Racing - What Will It Look Like?

What will races look like during the COVID 19 Pandemic? We've got some of the answers in this blog post!
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Ironman
Like an effective taper protocol, the Ironman marathon remains one of the greatest mysteries of our sport. “A mystery, wrapped in an enigma”, those who have it figured out make it look so easy, and we wonder how and why it is possible to run with such ease, after a 112-mile ride. They are few and far between, but we see them at every race, running their way through fields of competitors who can only watch as they pass by.
Meet OutRival Racing athlete Stewart Frey coached by Dawn English.
Throw-back blog (circa 2009) from QT2 Founder Jesse Kropelnicki on why training too hard kills consistency and leads to injury and impedes long-term performance.
Meet OutRival Racing Team Member Ken Campbell coached by Jackie Miller.
Signing up for your very first full Ironman is an exciting and scary time! If you are considering crossing the threshold over to the 140.6 distance, here are some things to consider. While Ironman can provide personal fulfillment and a sense of a great achievement, be aware of the time and financial costs involved before hitting the confirmation button on the registration page. Training will start off manageable, with anywhere between 5 to 10 hours a week. At the height of training, an athlete may get into the 15-20 hours per week range. (For some maybe more!) Does your career and family life allow for this type of time commitment? If not, maybe now is not the right time. If yes, then it is a good idea to sit down with your family, significant other and boss to explain WHY you want to do this, WHY it is important to you, and the time and money involved in this endeavor. If they know what to expect and the reasons as to why it is important to you, it will make it easier on everyone and you will find yourself with a good support system.
If you’ve read the intrepid Jesse Kropelnicki’s thoughts on integrating hiking into your Ironman training, you know how beneficial it is. Hiking is a terrific opportunity to build durability and practice fueling, all while visiting some beautiful scenery. And, even though many states currently have COVID travel restrictions, that doesn’t mean you can’t explore your area!
You’re chasing a big, new goal and ready to hire a triathlon coach to help guide your training. But how do you find a coach who fits your needs? There are several questions to consider: What type of personality motivates you? What type of feedback would you like for your training sessions? USA Triathlon Level I Certified Coach Taylor Mahan-Rudolph gives her tips to find the right coach for you.
As a woman getting my PhD, I had plenty of doubts – most of all wondering if I really did belong there. Finding triathlon, however, was different. First, when I started in 2014, I had no idea what I was doing and that was a bit of a blessing in disguise, when you don’t know what you don’t know, it's hard to question it. Second, it was just for fun, a new hobby, and outlet for energy. Third, it turned out I was fairly good at it, the swim was hard, but I could make up for that on the bike and the run, of which especially the last came a lot more natural to me. As I progressed to the 70.3 distance, and the realization came that I could compete at the top end of the age group field grew, the pressure did go up a bit. I was however still so new at all of this that the elements of joy and surprise outshone any doubts I had about myself.
If you are about to race to race your first Ironman or maybe just need some reminders on race day tips, Jackie Miller has you covered!
What will races look like during the COVID 19 Pandemic? We've got some of the answers in this blog post!