Mountain Biking for the Curious Triathlete

As summer draws to a close, we’re getting close to that annual “off season” we triathletes partake in each fall and winter. It’s the time of year for dabbling in a new sport and flexing different muscles that we don’t have time to use when the weekly schedule is consumed by swim, bike, and run. Mountain biking can be the perfect sport for the offseason because it allows you to spend time off the roads with the added bonus of improving the (dreaded) triathlete bike handling skills.
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Why Triathletes Should Dabble In Gravel

As a triathlete you have likely heard some things about gravel cycling but maybe haven’t tried it yet. As a triathlon coach for over ten years, I’m here to tell you – there are many reasons to check it out and here are the top 5.
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Finding Your Summit

At times, the climb is steep, and it hurts. I work to gain elevation only to then lose it as I round the bend. These consistent setbacks mirror those I have endured throughout my 30+ years of being involved in triathlon, which begs the question--why bother? Why bother doing all that work, mentally willing myself through moments of fatigue and suffering only to lose all momentum moments later?
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Fitness Does Not Expire

Some motivational words from Coach Molly Zahr, as we look to 2021.
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The Switch

“The day you stop racing is the day you win the race.” – Bob Marley
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No Safe Harbors

A few months back, I found myself under the surface of the ocean holding my breath at 80 feet, lying on some sand, just looking up at a rock cliff beside me. Utter silence, fish all around me. All I could think of was a song by The Talking Heads: “How did I get here? Letting the days go by, let the water hold me down Letting the days go by, water flowing underground Into the blue again, after the monkey’s gone Once in a lifetime, water flowing underground.”
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HIGH HAMSTRING TENDINOPATHY - THE WHAT, WHY, AND HOW TO TREAT THIS PAIN IN THE REAR!

Let’s face it-for triathletes, any injury is a figurative pain in the behind! Some, though, are quite literally so-and high hamstring tendinopathy is one of them. Although not as prevalent as some more common tendinopathies in the leg (as in, the Achilles tendon, or patellar tendon in the knee), high hamstring tendinopathies are notoriously stubborn, and frustrating to athletes and treating practitioners alike-something I can personally attest to (more than I’d care to admit), having been on both sides of that equation as a triathlete and physical therapist. So, what exactly is high hamstring tendinopathy? What leads to this issue? What can we do about it?
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Welcome To Virtual Racing

My experience with virtual racing thus far and some tips, if you'd like to try it too.
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Tri-ing in the New Normal

As triathletes, we embrace structure, predictability, control, routine.  We lay out our goals far in advance and then plan a season to prepare to achieve those goals. We develop a base, we build, we do race specific work, we taper, we race, and we do it again.  We swim on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.  We do our bike intervals on Tuesdays and our long ride on Saturdays.  We hit the track on Thursdays and do our long run on Sundays.  We mix in strength training and body work.  We focus on our nutrition before, during and after our training sessions.  We analyze our Garmin files.  We replace our running shoes as soon as they show wear.   We look for the latest gadgets, the fastest wetsuit.  All of our efforts are laser directed at achieving our goal of hitting that PR on our A race day.  
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Keep Training

Here we are – about to approach May 1st and, with a plethora of events being cancelled or postponed, race season 2020 is in jeopardy. With these cancellations, motivation to stay fit and healthy can be hard to maintain. Even with the world embracing the virtual training and race environment, most folks are still itching to get back to the real routine: early morning wake-up, pre-race jitters, and the elation of crossing the finish line.
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Cycling
As summer draws to a close, we’re getting close to that annual “off season” we triathletes partake in each fall and winter. It’s the time of year for dabbling in a new sport and flexing different muscles that we don’t have time to use when the weekly schedule is consumed by swim, bike, and run. Mountain biking can be the perfect sport for the offseason because it allows you to spend time off the roads with the added bonus of improving the (dreaded) triathlete bike handling skills.
As a triathlete you have likely heard some things about gravel cycling but maybe haven’t tried it yet. As a triathlon coach for over ten years, I’m here to tell you – there are many reasons to check it out and here are the top 5.
At times, the climb is steep, and it hurts. I work to gain elevation only to then lose it as I round the bend. These consistent setbacks mirror those I have endured throughout my 30+ years of being involved in triathlon, which begs the question--why bother? Why bother doing all that work, mentally willing myself through moments of fatigue and suffering only to lose all momentum moments later?
Some motivational words from Coach Molly Zahr, as we look to 2021.
“The day you stop racing is the day you win the race.” – Bob Marley
A few months back, I found myself under the surface of the ocean holding my breath at 80 feet, lying on some sand, just looking up at a rock cliff beside me. Utter silence, fish all around me. All I could think of was a song by The Talking Heads: “How did I get here? Letting the days go by, let the water hold me down Letting the days go by, water flowing underground Into the blue again, after the monkey’s gone Once in a lifetime, water flowing underground.”
Let’s face it-for triathletes, any injury is a figurative pain in the behind! Some, though, are quite literally so-and high hamstring tendinopathy is one of them. Although not as prevalent as some more common tendinopathies in the leg (as in, the Achilles tendon, or patellar tendon in the knee), high hamstring tendinopathies are notoriously stubborn, and frustrating to athletes and treating practitioners alike-something I can personally attest to (more than I’d care to admit), having been on both sides of that equation as a triathlete and physical therapist. So, what exactly is high hamstring tendinopathy? What leads to this issue? What can we do about it?
My experience with virtual racing thus far and some tips, if you'd like to try it too.
As triathletes, we embrace structure, predictability, control, routine.  We lay out our goals far in advance and then plan a season to prepare to achieve those goals. We develop a base, we build, we do race specific work, we taper, we race, and we do it again.  We swim on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.  We do our bike intervals on Tuesdays and our long ride on Saturdays.  We hit the track on Thursdays and do our long run on Sundays.  We mix in strength training and body work.  We focus on our nutrition before, during and after our training sessions.  We analyze our Garmin files.  We replace our running shoes as soon as they show wear.   We look for the latest gadgets, the fastest wetsuit.  All of our efforts are laser directed at achieving our goal of hitting that PR on our A race day.  
Here we are – about to approach May 1st and, with a plethora of events being cancelled or postponed, race season 2020 is in jeopardy. With these cancellations, motivation to stay fit and healthy can be hard to maintain. Even with the world embracing the virtual training and race environment, most folks are still itching to get back to the real routine: early morning wake-up, pre-race jitters, and the elation of crossing the finish line.