The Stuff You ACTUALLY Need To Race

When it comes to endurance racing, specifically triathlon, there is a TON of literature and talk about training, racing, fueling, motivation, recovery, and everything in between. As there should be – every athlete’s experience, preparation, fitness level, and mindset are different! I myself have literally written a post called “The Stuff You Need”. From all of this experience, however, there is one constant, and it’s very simple. In order to race, there is a list of things you physically need to actually participate in a triathlon.
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In Defense of the "Off Season"

Are you considering extending your tri season? Read this post by Coach Taylor.
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Triathlon Racing: Something For Everyone

Choosing a race: go big or go home, right?! All or nothing is a pretty typical mindset of a lot of endurance athletes. If you’re attracted to the sport of triathlon, you are a driven individual – this isn’t something you HAVE to do, it’s something you get to do for FUN. So why in the world would one put their bodies through the daily stress of preparation?! Because you are naturally driven. You like to strive for a goal, achieve, and feel that sense of accomplishment.
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A Case For Riding In The Rain

Read Coach Molly's Zahr's case for training outside in adverse conditions, and how it made her race at Ironman Ireland!
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The Wilderman Triathlon And The Story Of A Pesky Beaver

In July of 2018, 4 of us stood in Lake Placid, NY, watching the Ironman and discussing a little race called “Wilderman”. I had never heard of Wilderman, but it sounded intriguing: an off-road iron distance race – 2.4 mile swim, 111 miles of mountain/gravel biking and a 27+ miles “on foot”.
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Strength Training For Triathlon

Unsurprisingly, triathlon both creates strength imbalances, and exposes them. It creates imbalances because we’re doing the same motions over, and over, and over, and over, and over… And then it exposes strength imbalances in a couple ways: many injuries/pains are the result of muscle weakness/imbalance, and many performance limiters have their root in muscle strength/functionality.
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Can You Train Too Hard?

We’ve all done it. We all fall into the trap. The summer months have arrived, and it takes every ounce of our being to not take to the open road, and launch into every workout full-blast, determined to sweat our hearts out in the summer sunshine. We do this willingly, visioning our dreams of completion, achievement, personal bests, and all the other race day feels. We want our friends on Strava, Garmin, and all forms of social media to see how fast we went. How strong we are. How far we went, how far we’ve come, how far we’ll go. But is it too much? Is it too hard? Will you reach that goal?
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Racing In Europe? Nail Your Nutrition Just Right!

Headed to 70.3 Worlds in Nice, France (or any European Ironman event, for that matter), and wondering about on course nutrition and how it compares to what you might normally use? Read on!
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The Big Training Day

The concept of a massive over-distance day is nothing new to endurance athletes and something many do during their overload block of training for their key race (Ironman, ultra-marathon run or ultra-distance bike race like The Dirty Kanza 200). Personally, as an athlete and as a coach I am a big fan of this for multiple reasons I’ll explain here. There’s both an equal part physical training stimulus and a mental fitness stimulus. If one has never done an extreme endurance activity it’s kind of its own rite of passage if you will – the endurance athlete’s rite of passage.
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The Butterfly Affect

Coach Tim Snow started out writing a blog post called The Butterfly Affect, which ended up turning into something much more complex, and lengthy. It turned into something that could not really be most effectively shared in a blog-type setting. But, we wanted to make sure that it was made available to you in the typical way that you access our written content. To that end, please see, below, three different links, all of which will allow you to access the writing, in three different forms.
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Triathlon
When it comes to endurance racing, specifically triathlon, there is a TON of literature and talk about training, racing, fueling, motivation, recovery, and everything in between. As there should be – every athlete’s experience, preparation, fitness level, and mindset are different! I myself have literally written a post called “The Stuff You Need”. From all of this experience, however, there is one constant, and it’s very simple. In order to race, there is a list of things you physically need to actually participate in a triathlon.
Are you considering extending your tri season? Read this post by Coach Taylor.
Choosing a race: go big or go home, right?! All or nothing is a pretty typical mindset of a lot of endurance athletes. If you’re attracted to the sport of triathlon, you are a driven individual – this isn’t something you HAVE to do, it’s something you get to do for FUN. So why in the world would one put their bodies through the daily stress of preparation?! Because you are naturally driven. You like to strive for a goal, achieve, and feel that sense of accomplishment.
Read Coach Molly's Zahr's case for training outside in adverse conditions, and how it made her race at Ironman Ireland!
In July of 2018, 4 of us stood in Lake Placid, NY, watching the Ironman and discussing a little race called “Wilderman”. I had never heard of Wilderman, but it sounded intriguing: an off-road iron distance race – 2.4 mile swim, 111 miles of mountain/gravel biking and a 27+ miles “on foot”.
Unsurprisingly, triathlon both creates strength imbalances, and exposes them. It creates imbalances because we’re doing the same motions over, and over, and over, and over, and over… And then it exposes strength imbalances in a couple ways: many injuries/pains are the result of muscle weakness/imbalance, and many performance limiters have their root in muscle strength/functionality.
We’ve all done it. We all fall into the trap. The summer months have arrived, and it takes every ounce of our being to not take to the open road, and launch into every workout full-blast, determined to sweat our hearts out in the summer sunshine. We do this willingly, visioning our dreams of completion, achievement, personal bests, and all the other race day feels. We want our friends on Strava, Garmin, and all forms of social media to see how fast we went. How strong we are. How far we went, how far we’ve come, how far we’ll go. But is it too much? Is it too hard? Will you reach that goal?
Headed to 70.3 Worlds in Nice, France (or any European Ironman event, for that matter), and wondering about on course nutrition and how it compares to what you might normally use? Read on!
The concept of a massive over-distance day is nothing new to endurance athletes and something many do during their overload block of training for their key race (Ironman, ultra-marathon run or ultra-distance bike race like The Dirty Kanza 200). Personally, as an athlete and as a coach I am a big fan of this for multiple reasons I’ll explain here. There’s both an equal part physical training stimulus and a mental fitness stimulus. If one has never done an extreme endurance activity it’s kind of its own rite of passage if you will – the endurance athlete’s rite of passage.
Coach Tim Snow started out writing a blog post called The Butterfly Affect, which ended up turning into something much more complex, and lengthy. It turned into something that could not really be most effectively shared in a blog-type setting. But, we wanted to make sure that it was made available to you in the typical way that you access our written content. To that end, please see, below, three different links, all of which will allow you to access the writing, in three different forms.