The Big Training Day

The concept of a massive over-distance day is nothing new to endurance athletes and something many do during their overload block of training for their key race (Ironman, ultra-marathon run or ultra-distance bike race like The Dirty Kanza 200). Personally, as an athlete and as a coach I am a big fan of this for multiple reasons I’ll explain here. There’s both an equal part physical training stimulus and a mental fitness stimulus. If one has never done an extreme endurance activity it’s kind of its own rite of passage if you will – the endurance athlete’s rite of passage.
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The Butterfly Affect

Coach Tim Snow started out writing a blog post called The Butterfly Affect, which ended up turning into something much more complex, and lengthy. It turned into something that could not really be most effectively shared in a blog-type setting. But, we wanted to make sure that it was made available to you in the typical way that you access our written content. To that end, please see, below, three different links, all of which will allow you to access the writing, in three different forms.
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Training to Race in the Heat

Heat training relates to the techniques directed to improve performance in warm climates, while heat acclimation is the process by which an athlete becomes accustomed to increased heat over a 4 to 14-day period. Putting these two things together, and you get acclimatization. Acclimatization, is the entire spectrum of heat training, including the initial acclimation period through the time frame, leading to race day.
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Caffeine: Use Don't Abuse

Caffeine can be a great tool for athletes of all abilities used to enhance performance. However, when abused (or not used as a tool), it can be a detriment to your training and racing.
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Your Why

A few weekends ago I had the opportunity to coach 116 athletes at the Austin half marathon. For these athletes their why is a concrete one. To find a cure for an illness they are all in one way or another impacted by. I had the honor and privilege to speak as the charities inspirational speaker the night before the race where I talked about the importance of having a why. Having an intention for our training and racing can mentally be that extra 1% that pushes us just a little harder. Our whys can change race to race and its important to go back to them on a regular basis.
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Thoughts On Perfect Race Season Planning

“What’s your A race?” This is a pretty common question among triathletes heading into a new season. For many of us, we have just one race a season that is most important to us. For others it might be two. You may want to be able to treat every race in a season as the most important race, but the fact of the matter is that for most triathletes, it’s simply not possible to truly peak more than once or twice a year.
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Heart Rate Training 101

February is National Heart Month so when better to think about heart rate training! This Q will help you learn more about HOW to utilize heart rate in your training. Below, I have responded to the most commonly asked questions.
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A Note To Moms

One of the most significant life changing moments for me was when I became a Mom. The added responsibility of taking care of another human being has been extremely overwhelming, and the sacrifices along the way have been endless. The days of just worrying about myself have come and gone. Today it is all about balance and finding that happy medium, which does exist…if you let it.
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10+1 Keys To A Successful Season

I have been fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with a variety of athletes, their abilities ranging from beginner triathletes participating in their first event to experienced, elite age group athletes. Regardless of their experience or ability level, the common thread for all is their pursuit of a personal goal. Being integral to helping athletes achieve their personal athletic successes is highly rewarding. What makes it such a positive challenge is the fact that every athlete is different. Each athlete has different means and availability for training, differing levels of motivation, and individual attributes that make them respond to training stimulus differently. What is consistent, however, are a number of factors I believe will result in individual success. Outlined below are what I consider these top eleven factors to be. Why eleven? Because we know that #11 always misses out on the top 10 list.
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Finley Peter Dunne

Rest in peace old friend…I know nothing of the man, other than what was available, to me, on Wikipedia. He was an author, and he died in 1936. I didn’t get much further than that. Having said that, he helped me to, in a single line, sum up what coaching is really all about. At least to me, and all of us at QT2 Systems, OutRival Racing, The Run Formula, and The Cycling Formula.
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Triathlon
The concept of a massive over-distance day is nothing new to endurance athletes and something many do during their overload block of training for their key race (Ironman, ultra-marathon run or ultra-distance bike race like The Dirty Kanza 200). Personally, as an athlete and as a coach I am a big fan of this for multiple reasons I’ll explain here. There’s both an equal part physical training stimulus and a mental fitness stimulus. If one has never done an extreme endurance activity it’s kind of its own rite of passage if you will – the endurance athlete’s rite of passage.
Coach Tim Snow started out writing a blog post called The Butterfly Affect, which ended up turning into something much more complex, and lengthy. It turned into something that could not really be most effectively shared in a blog-type setting. But, we wanted to make sure that it was made available to you in the typical way that you access our written content. To that end, please see, below, three different links, all of which will allow you to access the writing, in three different forms.
Heat training relates to the techniques directed to improve performance in warm climates, while heat acclimation is the process by which an athlete becomes accustomed to increased heat over a 4 to 14-day period. Putting these two things together, and you get acclimatization. Acclimatization, is the entire spectrum of heat training, including the initial acclimation period through the time frame, leading to race day.
Caffeine can be a great tool for athletes of all abilities used to enhance performance. However, when abused (or not used as a tool), it can be a detriment to your training and racing.
A few weekends ago I had the opportunity to coach 116 athletes at the Austin half marathon. For these athletes their why is a concrete one. To find a cure for an illness they are all in one way or another impacted by. I had the honor and privilege to speak as the charities inspirational speaker the night before the race where I talked about the importance of having a why. Having an intention for our training and racing can mentally be that extra 1% that pushes us just a little harder. Our whys can change race to race and its important to go back to them on a regular basis.
“What’s your A race?” This is a pretty common question among triathletes heading into a new season. For many of us, we have just one race a season that is most important to us. For others it might be two. You may want to be able to treat every race in a season as the most important race, but the fact of the matter is that for most triathletes, it’s simply not possible to truly peak more than once or twice a year.
February is National Heart Month so when better to think about heart rate training! This Q will help you learn more about HOW to utilize heart rate in your training. Below, I have responded to the most commonly asked questions.
One of the most significant life changing moments for me was when I became a Mom. The added responsibility of taking care of another human being has been extremely overwhelming, and the sacrifices along the way have been endless. The days of just worrying about myself have come and gone. Today it is all about balance and finding that happy medium, which does exist…if you let it.
I have been fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with a variety of athletes, their abilities ranging from beginner triathletes participating in their first event to experienced, elite age group athletes. Regardless of their experience or ability level, the common thread for all is their pursuit of a personal goal. Being integral to helping athletes achieve their personal athletic successes is highly rewarding. What makes it such a positive challenge is the fact that every athlete is different. Each athlete has different means and availability for training, differing levels of motivation, and individual attributes that make them respond to training stimulus differently. What is consistent, however, are a number of factors I believe will result in individual success. Outlined below are what I consider these top eleven factors to be. Why eleven? Because we know that #11 always misses out on the top 10 list.
Rest in peace old friend…I know nothing of the man, other than what was available, to me, on Wikipedia. He was an author, and he died in 1936. I didn’t get much further than that. Having said that, he helped me to, in a single line, sum up what coaching is really all about. At least to me, and all of us at QT2 Systems, OutRival Racing, The Run Formula, and The Cycling Formula.