Hips Don't Lie

In order to swim, you must have the mental and physical capabilities to perform an elaborate physics experiment. No other sport, requires such a high demand of physical suppleness and awareness to engage properly with the environment to propel ones self forward. In cycling, you engage with the bike at 5 spots. This physical engagement propels you forward. In running, there are two points of contact with the solid earth, which through physical engagement will propel you forward. In swimming, we have the challenge of being face down in the water, trying to grab this liquid substance with a hand, with the goal of moving the body forward. What we often don’t realize is that the body moves past the hand and arm. Upon entry the catch is initialized, at this moment the hand and arm are now stationary in the water. The next process is what separates the efficient swimmer from the inefficient swimmer.
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Make the Most of Indoor Pool Training, For Open Water Swim Success

Triathlon training in anywhere other than the south, is not for the faint of heart. Based on the “spring” we’ve had so far up north, we are left wondering if we’ll EVER get outside to do some open water swims! While open water swimming is imperative to swimming confidently and strong in a triathlon, indoor swimming provides lots of benefits to prepare you for open water swims. Read on to learn how to make the most of your pool swims and you’ll be ready for a successful race season when warmer weather FINALLY arrives.
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Mastering The Open Water Swim

Whether you are an aspiring open water competitor or a triathlete, open water swimming can be an intimidating skill to conquer. Unlike the pool, open water can have varying conditions (think glassy smooth to whitecap chop) and poor visibility. Add to that a few hundred swimmers around you, and it’s no wonder even elite pool swimmers can struggle in open water. Read on for some tips to help you master the skills of open water swimming.
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So you want to swim fast? Propulsion. (PART THREE!)

Once you have worked on the specific techniques to help reduce drag in the water and improve streamlining, you can work on increasing propulsion in the water. Propulsion is improved first and foremost by working on stroke mechanics and then becoming efficient in applying a force to the water. The combined effects of body balance, streamlining and good stroke mechanics are what lead to faster swimming.
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So you want to swim fast? An introduction to drag (PART TWO!).

In the last ORR blog, I introduced you to the first facet of swimming fast and provided you with the first 5 of my top 10 drills. In this article, I am going to illustrate the next 5 drills that will help to improve your balance and alignment in the water. Each drill can be performed with or without long fins.
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So you want to swim fast? An introduction to drag.

Intensity and duration of swim workouts are definitely important when trying to swim fast. As these components increase, fitness will improve and speed will get faster, but only to a point. Training harder and longer has its limits. For most of us, there is only so much time we all have available to swim and there is only so much intensity that the body can cope with. At some point, increasing intensity and duration will not be enough to recognize gains in swimming.
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Swimming – Are you GLIDING or REACHING?

Enter… Glide…. Pull….Repeat….. How many times have you heard your swim coach tell you to this?
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ORR Beginner Triathlon Guide, Part 3 - The Swim!

Article 3 of beginner triathlon series covers how to conquer the swim!
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Swimming
In order to swim, you must have the mental and physical capabilities to perform an elaborate physics experiment. No other sport, requires such a high demand of physical suppleness and awareness to engage properly with the environment to propel ones self forward. In cycling, you engage with the bike at 5 spots. This physical engagement propels you forward. In running, there are two points of contact with the solid earth, which through physical engagement will propel you forward. In swimming, we have the challenge of being face down in the water, trying to grab this liquid substance with a hand, with the goal of moving the body forward. What we often don’t realize is that the body moves past the hand and arm. Upon entry the catch is initialized, at this moment the hand and arm are now stationary in the water. The next process is what separates the efficient swimmer from the inefficient swimmer.
Triathlon training in anywhere other than the south, is not for the faint of heart. Based on the “spring” we’ve had so far up north, we are left wondering if we’ll EVER get outside to do some open water swims! While open water swimming is imperative to swimming confidently and strong in a triathlon, indoor swimming provides lots of benefits to prepare you for open water swims. Read on to learn how to make the most of your pool swims and you’ll be ready for a successful race season when warmer weather FINALLY arrives.
Whether you are an aspiring open water competitor or a triathlete, open water swimming can be an intimidating skill to conquer. Unlike the pool, open water can have varying conditions (think glassy smooth to whitecap chop) and poor visibility. Add to that a few hundred swimmers around you, and it’s no wonder even elite pool swimmers can struggle in open water. Read on for some tips to help you master the skills of open water swimming.
Once you have worked on the specific techniques to help reduce drag in the water and improve streamlining, you can work on increasing propulsion in the water. Propulsion is improved first and foremost by working on stroke mechanics and then becoming efficient in applying a force to the water. The combined effects of body balance, streamlining and good stroke mechanics are what lead to faster swimming.
In the last ORR blog, I introduced you to the first facet of swimming fast and provided you with the first 5 of my top 10 drills. In this article, I am going to illustrate the next 5 drills that will help to improve your balance and alignment in the water. Each drill can be performed with or without long fins.
Intensity and duration of swim workouts are definitely important when trying to swim fast. As these components increase, fitness will improve and speed will get faster, but only to a point. Training harder and longer has its limits. For most of us, there is only so much time we all have available to swim and there is only so much intensity that the body can cope with. At some point, increasing intensity and duration will not be enough to recognize gains in swimming.
Enter… Glide…. Pull….Repeat….. How many times have you heard your swim coach tell you to this?
Article 3 of beginner triathlon series covers how to conquer the swim!