HIGH HAMSTRING TENDINOPATHY - THE WHAT, WHY, AND HOW TO TREAT THIS PAIN IN THE REAR!

Let’s face it-for triathletes, any injury is a figurative pain in the behind! Some, though, are quite literally so-and high hamstring tendinopathy is one of them. Although not as prevalent as some more common tendinopathies in the leg (as in, the Achilles tendon, or patellar tendon in the knee), high hamstring tendinopathies are notoriously stubborn, and frustrating to athletes and treating practitioners alike-something I can personally attest to (more than I’d care to admit), having been on both sides of that equation as a triathlete and physical therapist. So, what exactly is high hamstring tendinopathy? What leads to this issue? What can we do about it?
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The "Broken Marathon Challenge" Race Report

On May 17th, Joe Rich embarked on a Marathon Challenge. This was not a straight forward marathon. At the beginning of each hour – first run at 8AM, last run at 8PM - Joe ran at least 2 miles (the first run was 2.2) until he got to a full marathon. Read his race report, including nutrition, pacing, mental strategy, and his fastest split (the second to last run) in this blog post!
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Tri-ing in the New Normal

As triathletes, we embrace structure, predictability, control, routine.  We lay out our goals far in advance and then plan a season to prepare to achieve those goals. We develop a base, we build, we do race specific work, we taper, we race, and we do it again.  We swim on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.  We do our bike intervals on Tuesdays and our long ride on Saturdays.  We hit the track on Thursdays and do our long run on Sundays.  We mix in strength training and body work.  We focus on our nutrition before, during and after our training sessions.  We analyze our Garmin files.  We replace our running shoes as soon as they show wear.   We look for the latest gadgets, the fastest wetsuit.  All of our efforts are laser directed at achieving our goal of hitting that PR on our A race day.  
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Treadmill Training

The fall races have concluded and the ramp up for the next season has not yet begun. Athletes are enjoying their time off, catching up with friends and family, and perhaps enjoying the relaxed lifestyle a little bit too much. But once the new year comes, it’s time to get back on the horse and resume a structured training program. Unfortunately, for many of our athletes, this resumption coincides with less hospitable outdoor training conditions. Gone are the long, warm days, replaced by the short, cold, icy days. As a result, much of off-season training is done indoors. On the run, that means time on the treadmill. Many athletes dread the treadmill runs, so how do you keep your athletes motivated and best utilize the time indoors?
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Couch to 100K

Read about Coach Doug MacLean's journey from back surgery to 100K finish line!
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Making the Runner-to-Triathlete Transition

One of the things that make triathlon so interesting is the diversity of the athletes who come to the sport. Triathlon can be thought of as the “melting pot” of all sport. There is not one athletic background that can “make” a triathlete. An advanced swimmer, cyclist, or runner, may have some advantage starting up in the sport, but the training approach, as well as the mental outlook, of what made them an advanced athlete in that sole sport, may have to be adjusted, once initiating triathlon training.
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Periodization Defined

If you consider yourself to be anything beyond a “casual runner” or “beginner triathlete”, you probably have heard of the term “periodization”. Periodization is an important in training to ensure long term improvement, avoid plateaus, and make sure the athlete is in peak condition at the appropriate time in their season. Without periodization, an athlete can achieve solid fitness, but reaching their “peak potential” at the time they want it to happen, will be unlikely.
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Announcing our PA/Ohio Area Lecture Series!

PA/OH area lecture series presented by Coaches Amy Javens and Chris Gillin.
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So, Now What? - Eight Tips For Surviving The Post Race Letdown

The season is winding down and even over for most. For some, this is a relief, for others it is a bit of a “what do I do now” kind of feeling.
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OutRival Racing Coaching Services

Overview of ORR Coaching Services!
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Running
Let’s face it-for triathletes, any injury is a figurative pain in the behind! Some, though, are quite literally so-and high hamstring tendinopathy is one of them. Although not as prevalent as some more common tendinopathies in the leg (as in, the Achilles tendon, or patellar tendon in the knee), high hamstring tendinopathies are notoriously stubborn, and frustrating to athletes and treating practitioners alike-something I can personally attest to (more than I’d care to admit), having been on both sides of that equation as a triathlete and physical therapist. So, what exactly is high hamstring tendinopathy? What leads to this issue? What can we do about it?
On May 17th, Joe Rich embarked on a Marathon Challenge. This was not a straight forward marathon. At the beginning of each hour – first run at 8AM, last run at 8PM - Joe ran at least 2 miles (the first run was 2.2) until he got to a full marathon. Read his race report, including nutrition, pacing, mental strategy, and his fastest split (the second to last run) in this blog post!
As triathletes, we embrace structure, predictability, control, routine.  We lay out our goals far in advance and then plan a season to prepare to achieve those goals. We develop a base, we build, we do race specific work, we taper, we race, and we do it again.  We swim on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.  We do our bike intervals on Tuesdays and our long ride on Saturdays.  We hit the track on Thursdays and do our long run on Sundays.  We mix in strength training and body work.  We focus on our nutrition before, during and after our training sessions.  We analyze our Garmin files.  We replace our running shoes as soon as they show wear.   We look for the latest gadgets, the fastest wetsuit.  All of our efforts are laser directed at achieving our goal of hitting that PR on our A race day.  
The fall races have concluded and the ramp up for the next season has not yet begun. Athletes are enjoying their time off, catching up with friends and family, and perhaps enjoying the relaxed lifestyle a little bit too much. But once the new year comes, it’s time to get back on the horse and resume a structured training program. Unfortunately, for many of our athletes, this resumption coincides with less hospitable outdoor training conditions. Gone are the long, warm days, replaced by the short, cold, icy days. As a result, much of off-season training is done indoors. On the run, that means time on the treadmill. Many athletes dread the treadmill runs, so how do you keep your athletes motivated and best utilize the time indoors?
Read about Coach Doug MacLean's journey from back surgery to 100K finish line!
One of the things that make triathlon so interesting is the diversity of the athletes who come to the sport. Triathlon can be thought of as the “melting pot” of all sport. There is not one athletic background that can “make” a triathlete. An advanced swimmer, cyclist, or runner, may have some advantage starting up in the sport, but the training approach, as well as the mental outlook, of what made them an advanced athlete in that sole sport, may have to be adjusted, once initiating triathlon training.
If you consider yourself to be anything beyond a “casual runner” or “beginner triathlete”, you probably have heard of the term “periodization”. Periodization is an important in training to ensure long term improvement, avoid plateaus, and make sure the athlete is in peak condition at the appropriate time in their season. Without periodization, an athlete can achieve solid fitness, but reaching their “peak potential” at the time they want it to happen, will be unlikely.
PA/OH area lecture series presented by Coaches Amy Javens and Chris Gillin.
The season is winding down and even over for most. For some, this is a relief, for others it is a bit of a “what do I do now” kind of feeling.
Overview of ORR Coaching Services!