Tapping Into The Power of Now With Your Sport

As a triathlete, a cyclist, a runner trying to achieve your goals, you are most likely very driven. Your competitive spirit is brimming over the top and that motivates you to train. Add in your job/career and your family and it’s clear how busy your life is. Add in the context of a culture that glorifies busyness and has made exhaustion a status symbol. Burnout and even resentment toward your sport of choice is a very real possibility.
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The Mary Cain Effect

Perhaps you remember an opinion article written a few years ago in the New York Times titled “How The ‘Shalane Flanagan Effect’ Works.” Written by Lindsay Crouse, the story celebrated Flanagan’s 2017 NYC Marathon victory. It highlighted her ability to lead teammates within her squad for the betterment and enlightenment of herself and others, while embracing the message that success doesn’t necessarily mean that others need to lose for us to win. Our gain doesn’t have to be another’s pain; that “power in numbers” always trumps one’s own lonely rise to the top. This article sparked a wave of female empowerment of “women empowering women” and the infamous “%*K Yeah” moment of female success.
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Aging Gracefully (In Sport)

This past February I did a 3/20 test on the bike. For those non-QT2 folks reading this, that’s our version of an FTP test. In other words, ride really hard and see what kind of average power and heart rate you can produce.
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The Stuff You ACTUALLY Need To Race

When it comes to endurance racing, specifically triathlon, there is a TON of literature and talk about training, racing, fueling, motivation, recovery, and everything in between. As there should be – every athlete’s experience, preparation, fitness level, and mindset are different! I myself have literally written a post called “The Stuff You Need”. From all of this experience, however, there is one constant, and it’s very simple. In order to race, there is a list of things you physically need to actually participate in a triathlon.
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In Defense of the Off Season

Are you considering extending your tri season? Read this post by Coach Taylor.
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Triathlon Racing: Something For Everyone

Choosing a race: go big or go home, right?! All or nothing is a pretty typical mindset of a lot of endurance athletes. If you’re attracted to the sport of triathlon, you are a driven individual – this isn’t something you HAVE to do, it’s something you get to do for FUN. So why in the world would one put their bodies through the daily stress of preparation?! Because you are naturally driven. You like to strive for a goal, achieve, and feel that sense of accomplishment.
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FLATLANDERS BEHOLD! You Too, Can Race A Hilly Course!

Congratulations! You just signed up for a beautiful, scenic, mountainous triathlon or bike race! All you can imagine are cool mountain breezes, the scent of pine trees, wispy clouds behind a mountain range and maybe the sound of a rushing, rocky stream. SCRRRREEEECHHHH! BUT WAIT JUST A DARNED MINUTE! Oh no! You live in Florida? Texas? Or some other place, that is as flat as that table your laptop was sitting on when you registered for this get-up?!
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A Case For Riding In The Rain

Read Coach Molly's Zahr's case for training outside in adverse conditions, and how it made her race at Ironman Ireland!
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The Wilderman Triathlon And The Story Of A Pesky Beaver

In July of 2018, 4 of us stood in Lake Placid, NY, watching the Ironman and discussing a little race called “Wilderman”. I had never heard of Wilderman, but it sounded intriguing: an off-road iron distance race – 2.4 mile swim, 111 miles of mountain/gravel biking and a 27+ miles “on foot”.
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Strength Training For Triathlon

Unsurprisingly, triathlon both creates strength imbalances, and exposes them. It creates imbalances because we’re doing the same motions over, and over, and over, and over, and over… And then it exposes strength imbalances in a couple ways: many injuries/pains are the result of muscle weakness/imbalance, and many performance limiters have their root in muscle strength/functionality.
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Cycling
As a triathlete, a cyclist, a runner trying to achieve your goals, you are most likely very driven. Your competitive spirit is brimming over the top and that motivates you to train. Add in your job/career and your family and it’s clear how busy your life is. Add in the context of a culture that glorifies busyness and has made exhaustion a status symbol. Burnout and even resentment toward your sport of choice is a very real possibility.
Perhaps you remember an opinion article written a few years ago in the New York Times titled “How The ‘Shalane Flanagan Effect’ Works.” Written by Lindsay Crouse, the story celebrated Flanagan’s 2017 NYC Marathon victory. It highlighted her ability to lead teammates within her squad for the betterment and enlightenment of herself and others, while embracing the message that success doesn’t necessarily mean that others need to lose for us to win. Our gain doesn’t have to be another’s pain; that “power in numbers” always trumps one’s own lonely rise to the top. This article sparked a wave of female empowerment of “women empowering women” and the infamous “%*K Yeah” moment of female success.
This past February I did a 3/20 test on the bike. For those non-QT2 folks reading this, that’s our version of an FTP test. In other words, ride really hard and see what kind of average power and heart rate you can produce.
When it comes to endurance racing, specifically triathlon, there is a TON of literature and talk about training, racing, fueling, motivation, recovery, and everything in between. As there should be – every athlete’s experience, preparation, fitness level, and mindset are different! I myself have literally written a post called “The Stuff You Need”. From all of this experience, however, there is one constant, and it’s very simple. In order to race, there is a list of things you physically need to actually participate in a triathlon.
Are you considering extending your tri season? Read this post by Coach Taylor.
Choosing a race: go big or go home, right?! All or nothing is a pretty typical mindset of a lot of endurance athletes. If you’re attracted to the sport of triathlon, you are a driven individual – this isn’t something you HAVE to do, it’s something you get to do for FUN. So why in the world would one put their bodies through the daily stress of preparation?! Because you are naturally driven. You like to strive for a goal, achieve, and feel that sense of accomplishment.
Congratulations! You just signed up for a beautiful, scenic, mountainous triathlon or bike race! All you can imagine are cool mountain breezes, the scent of pine trees, wispy clouds behind a mountain range and maybe the sound of a rushing, rocky stream. SCRRRREEEECHHHH! BUT WAIT JUST A DARNED MINUTE! Oh no! You live in Florida? Texas? Or some other place, that is as flat as that table your laptop was sitting on when you registered for this get-up?!
Read Coach Molly's Zahr's case for training outside in adverse conditions, and how it made her race at Ironman Ireland!
In July of 2018, 4 of us stood in Lake Placid, NY, watching the Ironman and discussing a little race called “Wilderman”. I had never heard of Wilderman, but it sounded intriguing: an off-road iron distance race – 2.4 mile swim, 111 miles of mountain/gravel biking and a 27+ miles “on foot”.
Unsurprisingly, triathlon both creates strength imbalances, and exposes them. It creates imbalances because we’re doing the same motions over, and over, and over, and over, and over… And then it exposes strength imbalances in a couple ways: many injuries/pains are the result of muscle weakness/imbalance, and many performance limiters have their root in muscle strength/functionality.